Tag Archives: Eastern Yellow Wagtail

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Frosty wagtail on Faroes

By Yoav Perlman

Silas Olofson, Faroe Island’s top birder, found this super-smart Yellow Wagtail at Viðareiði (northernmost village on the Faroes – how to pronounce this I have no clue) today, 27/11/16. Silas did the right thing and got many photos of it, but most importantly recorded the call on video. At first look, the initial response for this grey-and-white bird is surely ‘tschutchu!’. Also given the late date, and the incredible autumn Faroes and Silas have had, this is a reasonable assumption. But… After a closer inspection of the photos, and listening to the calls on the video, I am leaning towards Western Yellow Wagtail.

Let’s start with the calls:

There are two calls of the bird in this short video. Without doing sonograms, it sounds like a typical Western Yellow Wagtail call. No sign of the sharp Citrine-like call of tschutchunensis. I am not aware of tschutchunensis that call like westerns.

The overall impression of this bird is indeed very close to what you’d expect from a 1cy Eastern Yellow Wagtail, not dissimilar to the Scilly bird that featured recently on Birding Frontiers.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

However, I think that when checking the fine plumage details of this bird, it appears to be an extremely cold-toned Western Yellow Wagtail, maybe flava? I am not sure.

The white wingbars and tertial fringes are rather limited in this bird:

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

I am aware of the fact that this observation takes place almost two months after the Scilly bird, so I am not sure how quickly these wingbars wear off.  But still I think they are too narrow for eastern.

Light conditions were poor when Silas saw the bird, but even in the dull light, yellow tones to underparts, rather prominent yellowish fringes to secondaries, and green tones to mantle and scapulars can be seen:

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Also note that ear coverts are not dark – there is quite a prominent pale area on the frontal ear coverts, below the eye.

A supporting feature is the length of the hind claw. This bird has a ‘normal-length’ hind claw, not the monstrous hind-claw of eastern. Of course this is very difficult to judge in the field, especially from photos only like I did, but my impression is of a normal hind claw.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Western (?) Yellow Wagtail, Viðareiði, Faroe Islands, 27 November 2016. By Silas Olofson.

Well done to Silas for finding this educational bird. And many thanks for sharing the photos and images with me. I know that I put my head on the chopping block here, but I will be happy to be proved wrong – if Silas gets yet another first for Faroes! Some ‘top guns’ have already commented that it’s an eastern…

Please comment. Learning time.

Eastern Yellow Wagtail in Scilly

By Yoav Perlman

Eastern Yellow Wagtail Motacilla (flava) tschutschensis is the eastern counterpart of Western Yellow Wagtail. It is divided into two main groups – ‘blue-headed’ with supercilium (tschutschensis and taivana), and ‘grey/black-headed’ without supercilium (plexa and macronyx).

Distribution map of yellow wagtails, from Bot, S., Gronendijk, D., and van oosten, H. H. (2014). Eastern yellow wagtails in -Europe: identification and vocalisations. Dutch Birding 36: 295-311.

Distribution map of yellow wagtails, from: Bot, S., Gronendijk, D., and van Oosten, H. H. (2014). Eastern yellow wagtails in Europe: identification and vocalisations. Dutch Birding 36: 295-311.

This is another taxon that seems to get identified in Western Europe in increasing frequency. There are three accepted records in the UK: Colyton, Devon in December 2010 bird that was DNA’d, featured in the definitive article by Sander Bot (2014) et al. (Dutch Birding 36: 295-311), Outer Skerries (Shetland) in 2011, and an old specimen from Fair Isle 1909. But there are some further recent strong candidates in the UK that ticked all (or most) boxes. Some have featured on Birding Frontiers before – for example here and here. Looking back through the archives of Birding Frontiers, the learning curve is apparent – Martin really pushed the boundaries here. With the progression of knowledge, it is possible that BBRC will accept future records without DNA, based on good photos and sound recordings.

This striking individual was present in Scilly earlier this month. To my eyes and ears it is a perfect example of an Eastern Yellow Wagtail. I want to thank Nigel Hudson (BBRC secretary) who helped me obtain material for this post, and kindly shared the ‘story’ of its discovery with me:

On October 13th, while Nigel was cutting his front garden grass, a group of birders that included Mark Andrews walked past his house as they headed out from Lower Moors on St. Mary’s. To his question if there was anything about, they showed him on their camera screens photos of an odd yellow wagtail, and they mentioned Eastern Yellow Wagtail as a possibility. Nigel rushed the whole 100 m from his house to where the wagtail was, and after initial views alerted local birders. They all obtained great photos of the bird and some sound recordings during the few days it stayed in the same area – a selection is presented here.

When identifying 1st-winter Eastern Yellow Wagtails, it is necessary to exclude Citrine Wagtail and Western Yellow Wagtail, and hybrids between the two (like this possible bird). A small proportion of 1st-winter Western Yellow Wagtails can give a similar monochromatic impression; and especially in the eastern fringes of the range; in beema and lutea, 1st-winters tend to be more monochromatic, lacking or almost lacking yellow and green tones, especially females (1st-winter males are on average yellower than females). In Eastern Yellow Wagtails a high proportion of 1st-winters are very grey-and-white. Some show faint yellow tones on the mantle, undertail coverts and tertial fringes, but the Scilly bird is as cold as it gets:

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. photo by Simon Knight.

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/.

Two Western Yellow Wagtails for comparison:

Western Yellow Wagtail (flava), Bet Kama, israel, 2 September 2013. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

Western Yellow Wagtail (flava), 1st-winter, Bet Kama, Israel, 2 September 2013. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

'British' Western Yellow Wagtail (flavissima), Spurn, East Yorkshire, 6 September 2015. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

‘British’ Western Yellow Wagtail (flavissima), Spurn, East Yorkshire, 6 September 2015. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

Eastern Yellow Wagtails are sometimes placed in the same phylogenetic clade together with Citrine Wagtail, and indeed share some morphological features.

DNA cladogram of several wagtail taxa, from Odeen, A., and Björklund, M. (2003). Dynamics in the evolution of sexual traits: Losses and gains, radiation and convergence in yellow wagtails (Motacilla flava). Molecular Ecology 12: 2113-2130.

DNA cladogram of several wagtail taxa, from: Odeen, A., and Björklund, M. (2003). Dynamics in the evolution of sexual traits: Losses and gains, radiation and convergence in yellow wagtails (Motacilla flava). Molecular Ecology 12: 2113-2130.

The call of Eastern Yellow Wagtail is close to the call of Citrine Wagtail, but not quite there with regard to high pitch and rasp.  Western Yellow Wagtail calls can be divided into two groups – sweet calls of western taxa (e.g. flavissima, flava) and rasping call of east European taxa (e.g. feldegg). I didn’t obtain a proper sound recording of the Scilly bird, but in this rather atmospheric video by Will Scott the diagnostic call can be heard at 0:06 (put your headphones on!).

Compared to Western Yellow, both Eastern Yellow and Citrine show more extensive white tips to greater and median coverts, creating two bolder white wingbars, and more white on tertial fringes.

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Though rarely 1st-winter Citrine Wagtails show incomplete ear coverts surround, Eastern Yellow Wagtail can be readily identified by wholly or predominately dark ear coverts, narrower supercilium, and pale base to lower mandible, just about visible here in this brighter photo, where some faint yellow and green hues can be seen:

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Kris Webb.

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Kris Webb.

1st-winter Citrine Wagtail for comparison:

Citrine Wagtail, 1st-winter, Ashdod, Israel, 16 September 2013. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

Citrine Wagtail, 1st-winter, Ashdod, Israel, 16 September 2013. Photo by Yoav Perlman.

Citrine and Eastern Yellow Wagtails also share a long hind-claw, longer than in Western Yellow. So if you see a wagtail with a hind-claw as long as this it might come from the east:

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Steve Young https://birdsonfilm.smugmug.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary's, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Eastern Yellow Wagtail, Lower Moors, St. Mary’s, Isles of Scilly, October 2016. Photo by Simon Knight http://simonknightphotography.zenfolio.com/

Many thanks again to Nigel Hudson and Will Scott who helped me with information and contacts; and to photographers Simon Knight, Steve Young and Kris Webb – they all have stunning images of lots of cool birds, check their websites!