Category Archives: 18) Warblers, Crests, Wrens

Fifteen of Eighteen

The Challenge Series: AUTUMN

Reed Warblers- four different ones, all potential finds this autumn. I have 3 on my own find list. Just need the ‘new one’. Reed Warbler, Caspian Reed Warbler- one at Spurn or Flamborough please! ;) , Blyth’s Reed Warbler and Marsh Warbler. All covered in chapter fifteen.

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Below, a fond memory from spring 2013:

Blyth's Reed Warbler h Fetlar May 2013

Thirteen of Eighteen

The Challenge Series: AUTUMN

Subalpine Warblers. 3 new species with wide post breeding dispersals. Plumage, calls and them wee tail patterns. And they always look beautiful.

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Adult male Eastern Subalpine Warbler October Martin Garner

Adult male Eastern Subalpine Warbler October Martin Garner

 

Twelve of Eighteen

The Challenge Series: AUTUMN

Lesser Whitethroats. 3 types reach western and northern Europe each autumn. This is a Birding Frontier. Who dares wins.

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These are getting easier to sort out…

 

probable Siberian Lesser Whitethroat blythi, October. Martin Garner

probable Siberian Lesser Whitethroat blythi, October. Martin Garner

Eleven of Eighteen

The Challenge Series: AUTUMN

That dynamic duo, the Common Chiffchaff and the Siberian Chiffchaff. Going back to the drawing board  a lot with this crowd!

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check out them ear coverts:

 

Siberian Chiffchaff by Tristan Reid http://www.theinkednaturalist.co.uk/

Siberian Chiffchaff by Tristan Reid http://www.theinkednaturalist.co.uk/

Saharan versus Western Olivaceous Warbler

and the ID challenge of Western Tree Warblers

Following on from this post, seems worth exploring the subject a little further. The most likely ID of the Fuerteventura warbler seems to be of the Saharan Olivaceous Warbler. However without field notes and only photos to go on it’s a little tricky for the outside observer. I found it intriguing as I have never seen the taxon and kind of wondered what it might get called if it turned up in NW Europe? Would I know what it was?

With multiple taxa, the old Olivaceous Warbler group is tricky one to member/ get your head around. So here is a reminder of how it plays out following the split of Western and Eastern Olivaceous Warblers:

Western Olivaceous Warbler Iduna opaca (just the one taxa)

Eastern Olivaceous warbler Iduna pallida (several taxa, those in Western Palearctic region:)

pallida

elaeica

reiseri

Nick Watmough and Grahame Walbridge made helpful comments as well as Ricardo and Andrea HERE and Nick sent some very useful comparison shots of Western Olivaceous Warbler:

Hi Martin,

I see this bird is now on the rarebirdspain website as Saharan OW and probably with good reason. I suspect the bill structure (based judged on front on photo on RBS site) excludes Western OW – please find attached a couple of shots of Western Olivaceous Warbler taken in Morocco in May 2013 (actually no more than 50km from where we saw Saharan OW).  By chance they are taken from below and show the shape of long deep-based bill quite well.  To my mind Western OW is a bigger sturdier beast that either Saharan OW or my  recollections of eleiaca (which I assume  account for all UK records?), but as ever that is hard to judge from photos.

All the best, Nick

Western Olivaceous Warbler 'opaca', Morocco, May 2913. Nick Watmough

Western Olivaceous Warbler ‘opaca’, Morocco, May 2913. Nick Watmough

Western Olivaceous Warbler 'opaca', Morocco, May 2913. Nick Watmough

Western Olivaceous Warbler ‘opaca’, Morocco, May 2913. Nick Watmough

Grahame Walbridge commented:

“The bird does not look anywhere near strong-billed enough for opaca. Lower mandible colour also looks wrong, should be entirely yellow. Pity there are no plan views (above or below) of the bill which would nail it for me.

Put simply it doesn`t look like a Western and combination of upperpart tone and lack of wing panel eliminate elaeica. By a process of elimination it must be Saharan (reiseri), though I am very uneasy at using this method in arriving at an ID! Probably safer to say “in all likelihood its a Saharan” or, something similarly tentative (unless more info forthcoming on field appearance).”

 

to compare with

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

 

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

apparent Saharan (Eastern) Olivaceous Warbler Iduna pallida reiseri, Fuerteventura, June 2014. Juan Sagardia

Olivaceous Warbler, but is it…

Eastern or Western?

Martin Garner

Juan Sagardia sent these photos from a couple of weeks ago. They were taken on Fuerteventura on the Canary Islands. This bird was a little over shadowed by a certain Abyssinian Roller  and also an apparent Eastern Bonelli’s Warbler.

I have seen not seen Western Olivaceous Warbler (Iduna opaca). The question is whether this individual is a Western Olly, or a ‘Western…. Eastern’. That is to say, the reiseri form of Eastern Olivaceous Warbler (Iduna pallida reiseri), which occurs in NW Africa (close to /overlapping? with Western Olivaceous).

No information on dipping tail movement (present in Eastern Olivaceous, absent in Western Olivaceous). Opinion from those who know the subject welcome. Not easy!

 

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and in case you missed it!

 

A couple more of Juan’s shot of the stunning Abyssinian Roller and that increasing familiar celebratory X men stand! :). All photos Juan Sagardia. See his Facebook Page.

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Abyssinian Roller on the Canaries

First for Spain and Europe

Juan Sagardia sent these superb photos yesterday with this comment:

 

Coracias abyssinicus in Fuerteventura

A specimen discovered in the Barranco de la Torre in Antigua on the island of Fuerteventura by Alain Pataud on June 92014.
It may be the first event of this sort to Europe.
We talked with zoos and none has ever had this species.
In the same place there was also a possible Phylloscopus orientalis. See what you think.
I have attached photos of the two species of yesterday (13th June 2014).
Best regards
Juan
More info on Rare Birds in Spain

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and an apparent  Balkan Warbler (aka Eastern Bonelli’s Warbler). Waiting to find out if it called….

!cid_DF3329AC-7086-4089-A071-ECA6FF993F34 !cid_2BF95586-1742-4D30-BACC-8AFB4E996819

all photos above by Juan Sagardia