Monthly Archives: July 2015

Follow the White Whale…

Dan Brown

As if you needed any more encouragement to head to the coast at this time of year, National Whale and Dolphin Week has its final weekend this coming Saturday and Sunday, so if you are free and keen then get out and record some cetaceans as well as seabirds!

More information can be found here.

And just to put the icing on the cake of temptation, a Beluga was filmed swimming along the Northern Irish coast at Dunseverick, Co Amtrim, yesterday. The video can be viewed here.

Beluga - exceptionally rare in Irish & British waters

Beluga – exceptionally rare in Irish & British waters

 

eilata Sand Martins

The Little, Rare Ones

by Martin G.

There are…

two themes running through some present posts.  The glorious Spurn Migration Festival (YES – I really want you to be there– (there is such high praise for the enjoyment so many folk get out of the migfest weekend). The second theme is on the Saturday evening talk at the Festival. Delivered by the hugely respected, and mega keen Yoav Perlman, it will be sure to open some eyes and be full of WOW factors.

One subject I have explored with Yoav are some of the curious and bewildering hirundines which pass, on migration, through Israel. It’s timely because….  when you visit Spurn, early September is the peak time for hirundine migration– Swallows and Martins.

Spurn and Sand Martins

As a warm-up here’s some stats from the (soon to be published) ‘The Birds of Spurn’ by Andy Roadhouse.

“Sand Martins generally have two broods, and this is shown with the autumn passage at Spurn. Two ‘waves’ of passage occur, the first from late June to early August and the second from late August to mid-September. In the earlier days of the Observatory the first wave would have largely gone unrecorded due to the lack of observers in the summer months. The highest counts in the first wave are 2800 on 5th August 1984, 2000 on 17th July 1999 and 15th July 2008. There is one exceptional count of 12,000 on 22nd August 1996, otherwise high counts in the second wave are 3000 on 28th August 2000, 2500 on 3rd September 2003 and 2000 on 20th August 1996.”

Our Sand Martins (nominate riparia)

You’ll see Sand Martins migrating at the festival- For sure! Here a couple of nominate Sand Martins trapped and ringed at Spurn (by Adam Hutt). Before rushing forward to the enigmatic eilata, check out the throat, breast band and overall head pattern of our Sand Martins. This is one has a tiny bit of streakiness on the throat sides.

sand martin spurn aah 1 (1 of 1) sand martin spurn aah 2 (1 of 1)

 

Enigmatic eilata – ‘Little’ Sand Martins in SPRING

The ringing station at Eilat provides one of the most thrilling migration encounters in the world. Hidden away under the wonderful colour and variety of bird species passing through the area is a ‘little brown job’. Trapping hirundines coming into roost in the evening proved the best opportunity of seeing an ‘eilata’ Sand Martin. The taxon was first recorded by Hadoram Shirihai and written up in Shirihai & Colston, (1992). (Though I don’t think diluta ‘Pale Martin’ passes through Israel as suggested in the article- just part of the learning).

I was fortunate with a little effort to see several individuals of eilata in early spring 2012.

eilata Sand Martin. Tiny with many nominate birds in the catch. Wing of 94 mm. This adult has more limited throat spotting than some.

eilata Sand Martin. Tiny with many nominate birds in the catch. Wing of 94 mm. This adult has more limited throat spotting than some.

 

They are tiny! Compared with nominate riparia Sand Martins they are slightly colder and paler brown with a much shorter wing length (over 100mm in nominate riparia). The eilata featured here had a wing length of 94mm. Other features included feathered tarsi and slightly more contrastingly dark lores: ‘sunglasses’.

Curiously neither the breeding nor wintering areas are known, nevertheless they represent up to 5% of the Sand Martins passing through Israel in spring.

Enigmatic eilata- ‘Little’ Sand Martins – in summer

This spring Francis Argyle was ringing Sand Martins in the Hula Valley. He trapped several ‘tiny Sand Martins’. A very small percentage among nearly 2000 nominate riparia. They were in juvenile plumage (age 3 for ringers). Francis writes:

“This spring, 20th March to 24th May, I have ringed 1990 Sand Martins. I ring in 4-day sessions of which three per month.7th to 10th May,  893 Sand Martins ringed of which only 1 tiny age 3 bird. 21st to 24th May just 1 tiny out of 379. 2nd to 5th July only 4 Sand Martins caught and all 4 were small age 3 birds although one had a wing length 105mm.

cheers, Francis”

These juveniles have much more patterning over the throat, sometimes looking more like a Brown-throated Martin (paludicola). From the very small sample of apparent juvenile eilata most of them had fringes to wing coverts closer to ‘silvery’ than ‘gingery-buff’. On passage birds at Spurn, gingery -buff os the normal type of juveniles with just occasional silvery ones. We blogged about there >>>HERE<<<.

Here’s what the apparent juvenile eilata look like. All photos by Francis Argyle.

juvenile Sand Martin eilata N. Israel, May 2015 F.SAM_2423SAM_2428SAM_2431SAM_2171SAM_2425SAM_2205

 

DNA

Francis collected a couple of feathers and with help from Yoav and the Prof (Martin Collinson) a very preliminary look said these were pretty bloomin’ well closely related to other Sand Martins. There are still plenty of questions though…

Martin Collinson:

“I have some preliminary results on the small Riparia riparia feather from Hula Valley, 20/5/15 (X264997). I put it through with a batch of cytb sequencing – there is only 1 cytb sequence for this species in GenBank – a bird collected in S Africa and therefore of unknown subspecies. Your bird is 99.4% identical to that one, i.e. very closely related.

Looking in the literature, although eilata has not been sequenced, COI and ND2 data suggest very little genetic differentiation (0.6%) between Sand Martins across the range, in US/Canada, Europe, through to East Asia, suggesting gene flow until very recently, and your bird fits with that general pattern.

Best wishes

Martin C.”

Really , really hope to see you at the Migration Festival. You won’t regret it!

……………………….To book go >>>HERE<<<

 

Spurn Migration Festival one

juvenile Yellow-legged Gulls

michahellis– NOW!

It’s that time of year. Can I reminisce momentarily? Just 20 years ago juvenile and first winter Yellow-legged Gulls were rarely identified with any confidence. There seemed just too tricky and confusing! I remember trying to unravel the riddles.

Slowly but surely a picture began to emerge. Lots of practice with close-up juveniles of Herring and Lesser Black-backed Gulls helped a lot.

Are you there yet? There are always a very satisfying local find.

Right now juvenile/ 1cy Yellow-legged GUlls are flung far and wide. Almost daily off Flamborough they are about and waiting to be found 🙂

So it was nice to ogle over these close-up photos by Brett Spencer of two young michs taken 2 days ago in Dorset.

_MG_7533 _MG_7660

2 photos above, 1cy Yellow-legged Gulls (michahellis) Dorset , 26th July 2015, Brett Spencer.

 

Chris Gibbins has just returned from Spain, so to add to the visual preparation, here are more young michahellis showing the striking upperparts in flight, especially the tail pattern. Also some more variation in plumage. Good luck!

4D2A80054D2A76164D2A94813 photos above, 1cy Yellow-legged Gulls (michahellis) Spain, July 2015, Chris Gibbins.

 

Swallows and Enigmas

Where Migration is Defined

I am always drawn back to my first birding love. The Swallow. I have written about this before, but the (Barn) Swallow is, above all others, THE species which hooked me as a 10/11 year old into the magic world of birds.

So as we approach the 3rd Migration Festival at Spurn, the Swallow will once again take centre stage. The Festival is on 3rd-5th September and early September is THE peak time for swallow migration there. I hope we get a big one! I have been there for a 20,000 bird morning and the spectacle is simply breath-taking. I would personally love you to be there to encounter such wonders. Info on booking HERE.

Swallows will also get a mention in the talks. I am especially looking forward to Yoav Perlman’s talk on the Saturday evening at the Migration festival on ‘Where Migration is Defined‘. Featuring the Arava Valley, Israel and the Middle East which is a place of spectacular migration.

There are enigmas too.

I think of the four commoner hirundines, each one has its own intriguing, sometimes shadowy plumage type/ subspecies which passes through the Middle East and especially Israel. They are mysteries! I bet we can draw Yoav out to talk more about them. 🙂

Ice-white Swallows with no breast bands.

I saw a few of these in the Nizzana region. There lots of comparison. Tons of nominate Swallows, tons of orange-bodied semi-resident ‘transitiva’ Barn Swallows. Then there are these things with icy-white plumage below and strangely weak breast band- like one of the SE Asian taxa of Swallow. ?$%£?

Yoav has seen similar birds in east Africa. What are they?

Barn Swallow Nitzana, Israel 11th Nov 2013Barn Swallow 2 Nitzana, Israel 11th Nov 2013Above. First winter Ice-white Swallows with reduced blue breast bands. November 2013. Nizzana, Israel. Martin Garner.

To follow:

Sand Martins. Normal ones and the ‘Little’ Sand Martin that can almost look like a brown-throated Martin.

House Martins. Normal ones and the dusky Asian House Martin scares.

Red-rumped Swallows. Do super streaky ones pass through as well as the regular type?

 

Book for migfest while your planning your start to autumn 🙂

Be great to see you there. More info/ booking etc. HERE.

 

 

 

Back to the Future #migfest

What will 2015 Bring?

Looking back to the Spurn Migration Festival last year gets my juices flowing. What will the 2015 Festival bring? I don’t want to miss out!

In some households…

Spurn Migration Festival oneor at least inside the heads of some birders, autumn has already begun. It really is the best season of the year. Why? Migration! Waders (aka shorebirds) have already begun their journeys and can be seen passing through NW Europe right now. That’s why some of us think autumn begins in mid-July. As we approach September this is the month when migration really enters full swing. Every year it’s hard to keep a lid on my excitement. Right now though somewhere around the corner, in the back of our minds– is the Spurn Migration Festival.

So to make sure I enter the spirit of it again and get myself ready I thought I would go back to the future. Here’s a quick reminder (from a ‘Birding Frontiers’ mindset) of last years’ #migfest.

Arriving

Arriving at Westmere Farm on the Friday last year I can remember the buzz. Yes, of all the human activity of preparation but it’s also a spot where live migration is immediately visible. Swallows and Meadow Pipits moving south right past the farm, Willow Warblers in the hedges and the radio crackling with news of both Wryneck and Barred Warbler. Plus the gripping sighting of a Bittern ( a good one for Spurn) found by those NGB birders. Flippin young bloods!

THE Wryneck that stole the best show-off award at hr 2014 festival. Performing admirably among the rock along  Humber shore- many birders, including me had never had such easy views. Another 2-3 Wryneck in the Spurn area over the #migfest  just showed how bloomin' marvellous the place is. Photo thanks to Richard Willison.

THE Wryneck that stole the best show-off award at hr 2014 festival. Performing admirably among the rock along Humber shore- many birders, including me had never had such easy views. Another 2-3 Wryneck in the Spurn area over the #migfest just showed how bloomin’ marvellous the place is. Photo thanks to Richard Willison.

Hundreds of Meadow Pipits and  a handful of Tree Pipits (pictured) provided the backcloth of migration action which never seems to stop at Spurn.

Hundreds of Meadow Pipits and a handful of Tree Pipits (pictured) provided the backcloth of migration action which never seems to stop at Spurn.

 

The Warren the buzz of people… and rare birds!

Sunday morning brought the rarest bird of the  the weekend when a calling Pacific Golden Plover flew south over the Warren and appeared to drop onto the Humber foreshore. Seen in flight and more especially  heard calling by many birders, most especially Dutch migration doyen PIm Wolf. PIm , who knows the subject well was unequivocal. It was a fulva (said with thick Dutch accent. I rushed down the join those searching but unfortunately the bird had evaporated over the vast mudflats. Soon after however a juvenile/ first winter Caspian Gull leisurely flapped its way along the Humber. Adam Hutt and I did a find/ ID double act quickly enough for everyone to get great views. A plumage or life tick for many present. The place is flippin’ awesome! Looking forward to the buzz of the people and the birds again.

Pacific Golden Plover flight call– have a listen to the call and be ready… click >>>HERE<<<

This 2nd calender year (moulting into 2nd winter) Caspian Gull was found a week later after a juvenile flew over big crowds at the Warren on #migfest Sunday (bird on the right. Photo thanks to Martin Standley.

This 2nd calender year (moulting into 2nd winter) Caspian Gull was found a week later after a juvenile flew over big crowds at the Warren on #migfest Sunday (bird on the right. Photo thanks to Martin Standley.

Learning Together

Several observers including one of our guest speakers, Pim Wolf had mentioned to me a rather brown looking Lesser Whitethroat in the Crown and Anchor car park (the bushes here are warbler heaven). I finally got time to take a look. Having just published the first in the Challenge Series with a whole chapter devoted to the different Lesser Whitethroats, I was, as they say, ‘in the zone’. Excellent views and scrutinised photos revealed a rather straightforward looking Siberian Lesser Whitethroat- a blythi.– but on 7th September?  That seems an outrageously early claim! The Migration Festival is a place where even the most experienced can learn. Two days later I found another candidate blythi back at Flamborugh.

What was going on?

Then the news came through of two Lesser Whitethroats trapped in late August, early September on the near continent. Both were suspected of being blythi. Both came back as confimed Siberian Lesser Whitethroats- part of the same ‘arrival’ as the bird at the Migration Festival. No-one ever thought they arrived this early. More learning for everyone! 

Siberian Lesser Whitethroat - this one was waiting for me back at Flamborough on return from the 2014 Spurn Migration Festival. The Spurn bird gave me confidence- we could really be getting these- later confirmed by DNA. We can now expect blythi from mid August- WOW!

Siberian Lesser Whitethroat – this one was waiting for me back at Flamborough on return from the 2014 Spurn Migration Festival. The Spurn bird gave me confidence- we could really be getting these- later confirmed by DNA. We can now expect blythi from mid August- WOW!

Great Crowd Pleasers

You can’t beat a show-off. Wrynecks and Barred Warbers kind of stole the show with several of each to see and for some lucky dudes even to find one. The BTO’s Nick Moran had his tent pitched at Westmere Farm and scored by finding a Barred Warbler in the hedge by his sleeping quarters- nice start to his day!

Find your Own. At least that's what Nick Moran (Birdtrack/BTO) did when he picked up a Barred Warbler in the hedge near his tent at the Spurn Migration Festival last year.

Find your Own. At least that’s what Nick Moran (Birdtrack/BTO) did when he picked up a Barred Warbler in the hedge near his tent at the Spurn Migration Festival last year.

 Lively discussion

A juvenile Baltic Gull candidate on Kilnsea Wetlands, The identification features of the juvenile Long-tailed Skua which flew north, enjoyed by many and the phenomenal variety of waders, wildfowl, seabirds and small birds all provided moments of lively discussion and learning. Live action in the field- you can’t beat it!

Juvenile Baltic Gull (at least it flipping looks like one!). A week after the 2014 Spurn Migration this was over my back fence. Discussion at #migfest while watching a bird  on Kilnsea Wetlands had spurred me on the look harder and work out some characters. Thank you Spurn Migration Festival.

Juvenile Baltic Gull (at least it flipping looks like one!). A week after the 2014 Spurn Migration this was over my back fence. Discussion at #migfest while watching a bird on Kilnsea Wetlands had spurred me on the look harder and work out some characters. Thank you Spurn Migration Festival.

juvenile Long-tailed Skua- This individual flew north giving chance for number of folk to study the characteristics of this ID challenge. Photo thanks to  David Constantine.

juvenile Long-tailed Skua- This individual flew north giving chance for number of folk to study the characteristics of this ID challenge. Photo thanks to David Constantine.

 

 

Inspiration!

Mike Dilger’s talk last year was inspiring and thoroughly enjoyable. It made you want to get out and have even more adventures with birds and wildlife. Meanwhile so many other talks meant a constant stream of opportunities to be inspired by others– both at the formal bits and just casually over a cuppa or out on a guided walk.

Mike Dilger speaking to a packed house on Saturday night at the Migration Festival in sept. 2014. On a personal note I am grateful to Mike for being so encouraging. He's coming back in 2015- not to speak but just because he loves the gig. Very cool!

Mike Dilger speaking to a packed house on Saturday night at the Migration Festival in sept. 2014. On a personal note I am grateful to Mike for being so encouraging. He’s coming back in 2015- not to speak but just because he loves the gig. Very cool!

Larking about

Yes there was a bit of that 🙂 . A ‘paint-off’ between Mike Dilger and meself organised by art extraordinaire  Darren Woodhead between two hopeless cases with a paint brush– proved one of plenty of moments of hilarity and lightness- and not taking oursleves too seriously- sheesh!

OK now I’m a little more pumped.

Bring on the Autumn-

Bring on the Spurn Migration festival 2015!

are you coming?

 

 

 

 

Why I chose a GX7 for digiscoping

By Steve Blain

Although I was generally happy with my Nikon V1 for digiscoping, I was looking for a step up in image quality.  The new wave of micro four-thirds cameras and high end compacts are giving excellent results, but which one to go for?  A bit of a crunch point came when my Nikon V1 lens started to malfunction, so I took the oportunity to get a new camera.

My Nikon V1 on my Swarovski ATS 80 HD and some Pine Warblers. Florida, January 2015

I was looking at a range of options.  My short-list included the Panasonic GH4, GH3, GX7, Sony NEX 6, A6000, RX100 mk2 and RX100 mk3, and Nikon V3.  For a handy side-by-side comparison of them all on DPreview.com click here.

They all seemed to have fantastic image quality but the ergonomics varied.  The questions I asked myself were these

  • Electronic View Finder – How much do I want or need an electronic view finder (EVF)? Some models had one as standard, others they were optional, and the quality of the EVF’s also varied.
  • Video quality and function – as I turn to this medium regularly to capture behaviour, good video capability was necessary.
  • Cost – Always a factor, with the highest value being the Panasonic GH4 (over £1200) down to the ‘cheapest’ being the Sony RX100 mk2 (at around £350).
  • Connectivity to my scope – will I have to purchase a new digiscoping adapter to make any new camera fit to my scopes eyepieces? A new adapter would add to the total cost.
  • Track record – how many other digiscopers use each camera?
  • How old are the cameras – were the manufacturers just about to bring out a new model with better specs?

 

Which camera?

Almost all the digiscoping ‘names’ online are now using a Panasonic GH4 for their digiscoping.  There are still a few who favour the Sony RX100 compact line but these are very much in the minority.  However, that option was certainly the least expensive out of those I’ve listed, and when I tested an RX100 in Cyprus the other year it produced lovely results, but I found the focus hard to acheive while only using the back screen to focus (no EVF).  The Mk2 version has an optional EVF, but this bumps up the price considerably and the Mk3 version has a built-in EVF but the resolution of it isn’t terribly high (in fact it is the same as my V1).  These are the only true compact cameras I considered looking at.  However, if I chose any of them I would need a new digiscoping adapter too.

The Nikon V3 looked an interesting option but the two digiscopers I knew had used one were not terribly impressed with the image quality (still a bit noisey), so that was out.  The two Sony’s were interesting too, but again the couple of digiscopers I know who had used them weren’t terribly impressed with their images either and had soon swapped cameras.

This brought be right back round to the tried and tested Panasonic micro 4/3’s line up – the GH4, GH3, and the GX7.  Out of the three the GH3 was the oldest – and the one Justin Carr uses.  Obviously this is a brilliant camera and produces great results but it has slightly older technology than in the GH4 and GX7.  So was the decision down to the GH4 and GX7?  There are three main differences between them – video quality, EVF quiality and price.  The video on the GH4 is 4K and on the GX7 it is standard HD – the price of the GX7 is around half that of the GH4 – and the EVF of the GH4 is bigger and brighter (although the resolution is similar).  Was the 4K video and nicer EVF really worth an extra £500?

I’d done some reading up around 4K video and what it really meant.  There is no doubt the quality of the video is far higher than anything else out there – each video frame is the equivilent of an 8 megapixel stills image!  However, it really eats your memory (they are huge files!) and you need a very powerful computer to work with the files too.  That said, the ability to take 30 frames a second of 8 megapixel images for almost half an hour means you could capture some fantastic images!  Very appealing indeed, however, we’re really at the birth of this type of technology in consumer cameras and the GH4 was the first to bring it to a mass market.  Working with such huge file sizes frame by frame also takes a totally different working approach and my computer would probably stuggle with them too.  I was leaning away from a GH4 on this factor alone.  However, given a couple more years, I suspect 4K video will become the norm, and certainly for birding and digiscoping it will open up a whole new world for capturing birds in incredible detail.

So where did that leave me?  It appeared we had a winner – the Panasonic GX7.  The other advantage this camera had over both the GH4 and the GH3 was size.  This is a much smaller range-finder type of camera and fits far better in a small shoulder bag than either of its bigger brothers would.

 

Lenses

The Panasonic 20mm f1.7 is widely regarded as one of the best lenses available for digiscoping on micro four-thirds cameras.  Unfortunately you are limited to manual focusing with it but with ‘focus peaking’ (dancing coloured pixels that show up around anything that is in focus) and a good EVF this process is fairly straight forward.  It is a also a short ‘pancake’ lens and in-keeping with my desire for a compact digiscoping set-up.

However, I was keen for more reach and the ability to use auto-focus.  After much research one lens stood out – the Olympus 14-42mm.  This compact zoom lenses construction made it vignette much less than the Panasonic equivalent and as it has all internal focusing, auto-focus works well too.  However, on using this lens for a while it is clear the coatings aren’t as good as the 20mm f1.7 – the colours aren’t as vivid and the contrast is lower with the zoom.  I am now wondering whether a fixed 30mm or 45mm lens will give me the boost I’m after for distant birds?  Another option is to use a conversion adapter with my Canon 50mm f1.8 lens – I am currently testing this out.

 

Which eyepiece to use?

Of course more reach could be achieved with the zoom on the scopes eyepiece – as I use a Swarovski ATS 80 HD the 25-50x would be the best to use.  However, thank’s to a chat to Justin Carr, the fixed 30x eyepiece seemed to be the one to use for quality – and so it has proven.

Spotted Flycatcher taken with the Panasonic GX7, 20mm f.1.7 lens, Swarovski ATS 80 HD and 30x eyepiece – quality.

Connectivity to my scope

Once I’d decided which camera to go for this became much simpler.  The GX7 being a rangefinder style camera is much lighter than the GH series, and which most digiscopers use with a platform type of adapter, connecting to the tripod bush below the camera.  I wanted to use my current gear which includes one of the very first adapters Swarovski made – the DCA.  It is still a very effective ‘bucket’ design which screws on to the lens of your camera and simply slots over the top of your eyepiece.  I like it a lot – it is quick, simple and has never let me down.

Don’t get me wrong, a platform adapter is probably the best all round design – it doesn’t put a strain on the filter thread of your lenses like the DCA does and it makes for a very secure fit to your scope.  However it also makes your whole set up more bulky and heavier too.  I’m still very much a birder first and digiscoper second so these last two points are important to consider when looking at the overall picture.

Now, all I need to do is make sure I could connect my lenses to one of my various DCA front plates.  The Olympus has a 37mm filter thread so that was easy – it went straight on the 37mm front plate.  The Panasonic 20mm was a bit more difficult as it has a 46mm filter thread.  This needed a stepping ring to match it to my 52mm front plate (very simply ordered off the internet).

Panasonic GX7, 46mm-52mm stepping ring, and Swarovski DCA adapter

 

So the next big question was – is there going to be any vignetting when using the lenses with my eyepieces?  Well, yes and no.  The Olympus does vignette, as expected, at the low end of its zoom range.  But this disappears at around 18mm – so very usable indeed.  The 20mm was just as good on the 30x eyepiece with no vignetting, and the same on the 25-50x.  However there was significant vignetting with the 20x eyepiece.  This was a bit disappointing as I really love using this eyepiece for close stuff.  I managed to work around this issue with a different digiscoping adapter I have though, so all was not lost.

The last thing to do was to test each eyepiece and lens combination to see which produced the best results.  I am still running through these, but I did have a tip-off from Justin Carr about what his favorite was – the fixed 30x eyepiece and 20mm f1.7 lens.  And he was absolutely right, in the few brief tests I’ve done this combo has been excellent and is currently my ‘go to’ set up for quality shots.

So, there you have it – my process for deciding on which camera to get for digiscoping, and how I resolved attaching it to my scope.

My new digiscoping set-up. Just what I’m after – compact, light, quick to attach and takes fantastic images and video.

A Rather confiding Red Footed Falcon Digiscoped

Posted by Justin Carr

A very showy  Red footed Falcon had been present in Deepest Staffordshire for nearly a week, luckily it decided to stick around for my next free day. Red foots are a cracking small falcon which drift over from Eastern Europe in Varying numbers mostly associating with South Easterly winds in May. When we arrived on site, i was surprised  to to see such a large crowd gathered i shouldn’t have been really with how amazingly close the bird showed, i should just say everyone stood behind a fence, it was the bird that came close to us not vice versa.         these are just a few of my favorite shots of the Stunning first Summer male.

All images Digiscoped on a Swarovski ATX 85                                                                                            Good Digiscoping!!