Northern Eiders off NE Canada

nostrils and carrots

Martin Garner and Bruce Mactavish

The Challenge of finding and identifying Northern Eiders ssp borealis as grabbed my (MG’s)  attention since around 1982! A water shed in the the 1990’s came with the find of a flock of 7 credible Northern Eiders off Fanad Head, co Donegal, with among Surf Scoter and a probable dresseri/ borealis intergrade. The same site eventually hosted the first Dresser’s Eider for the Western  Palearctic. Searching for sailed Eiders took off! NE Scotland became a boiling pot of Eiders, sails and lively discussion. Que this more recent paper:

Hellquist, A. 2014. Identification of Northern Eider. Dutch Birding 36: 221-231.

One of the author’s observations is that nostril postion can be discriminatory in identifying borealis from nominate mollissima. Simply put (and read the paper for the proper version!) you want a nostril position that is pretty much BEYOND the end of the feathering rather than heavily overlapping with it.

Start here to see what is meant with this nominate mollissima Eider in Varanger. The nostril overlaps with the end of feathering.

Common Eider nominate mollissima, Varanger Martin Garner

Common Eider nominate mollissima, Varanger Martin Garner

Common Eider nominate mollissima, Varanger Martin Garner

Common Eider nominate mollissima, Varanger Martin Garner

NE Canada

OK? Now I have always felt whenever delving into the subject that the Eiders of North East Canada were the most stand out- THIS is borealis baby land!  I have a high degree of Bruce Mactavish homeland envy and he has recently got some fantastic images showcasing the Canadian borealis.

Check out the nostril position on these shots by Bruce off Newfoundland last month:

Northern Eider ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015, Bruce Mactavish

Northern Eider ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015, Bruce Mactavish

Northern Eiders ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015. Bruce MacTavish

Northern Eiders ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015. Bruce MacTavish

Fanad, Co Donegal

Now have a look at this one taken of Fanad by Brett Richard’s. This bird was with the Dresser’s Eider.

Northern Eider, ssp borealis, Fanad, Donegal, Brett Richards. June2011.

Northern Eider, ssp borealis, Fanad, Donegal, Brett Richards. June2011.

NE Scotland

I trawled though quite a lot of shots of ‘sailed Eiders’ from NE Scotland. There might be some but I could find NONE with pro-borealis nostril position. Nada.

But this one- in Northumberland fits (if a little swollen)…

Apparent Northern Eider  ssp. borealis, Northumberland, May 2008 Tim Dean. The nostril position is very favourable!

Apparent Northern Eider ssp. borealis, Northumberland, May 2008 Tim Dean. The nostril position is very favourable!

Not all

This borealis (on range) on Svalbard would not be identifiable out-of-range.

Northern Eider ssp borealis, Svalbard, Chrys Mellow. This one has nostril no different to nominate mollissima

Northern Eider ssp borealis, Svalbard, Chrys Mellor. This one has nostril no different to nominate mollissima

and finally back to Bruce Mactavish in Newfoundland with grateful thanks…

He has a fantastic rich Eider vein to mine. V-nigrum, possibly v-nigrum intergrades, pucka borealis, Harlequins and as below Dresser’s Eider on the left with the King on the right.

Dresser's Eider- adult male in top left, with Northern Eiders ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015. Bruce MacTavish

Dresser’s Eider- adult male in top left, with Northern Eiders ssp. borealis, Newfoundland, Feb 2015. Bruce MacTavish

and this carrot bill still has me head scratching…

Carrotbill-x

 

 

4 thoughts on “Northern Eiders off NE Canada

      1. Brett Richards

        Hi Martin

        Using a protractor, I measured where a line would fall drawn at right angles to the top line of the nostril, from the top end of the nostril (hope this makes sense). In the Varanger nominate bird it falls across the white wedge of feathering, a little nearer to the tip of the white feathering than to the end of the black feathering – as you say, it overlaps. On the ‘good’ Northern borealis birds the line fell just about at the end of the white feathering, or slightly into the white feathering – little or no overlap. The thing that struck me about the borealis was how short the nostrils were. Although I think my bird probably is borealis, the nostril does not look good. It is not short, and the right-angled line falls well into the white feathering.

        Brett

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