Monthly Archives: December 2014

Eastern Black Redstart, taxon: phoenicuroides

Names and Calls

Martin Garner

A quick follow up to the post on this beautiful bird:

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1st Dec 2014 j

 

Calls

I have compared a few calls of ‘western’ gibraltariensis Black Redstarts with my recording of phoenicuroides Eastern Black Redstart at Scarborough, though ideally I need a better data set. Impressions in the field were that the Scarborough Eastern Black Redstart sounded similar but a bit different- kind of lower pitched or something and was discussed as such at the time. Subsequently spurred on  especially by Grahame Walbridge, there may be difference in pitch and possibly shape but I am not sure if variation in calls of both taxa render this obsolete or whether there really are useful differences. Need more time to look in to it!

If anyone has good quality recordings of Western and Eastern Black Redstarts, or thoughts on the subject- be great to hear from you.

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1 dec 2014 sonagram

 

English Names 

1cy male Eastern Black Redstart. Stef McElwee, November 2011, Holy Island, Northumberland

1cy male ‘Eastern’ Black Redstart. Stef McElwee, November 2011, Holy Island, Northumberland

Another subject briefly raised was the suitable English name for phoenicuroides.

Eastern Black Redstart seems inappropriate and confusing as here are several taxa that fit this catch-all term. I was a bit hasty in writing as subsequently friends (particularly Paul French) reminded me that we’d had a light-hearted discussion a couple of years ago on a suitable name for Eastern Back Redstarts – following the two first winter males in 2011 (also see photo above). Here’s what we came up with:

Kashmir Redstart– as others have pointed out, and we concluded at the time- even though this is out there as a potential name, Kashmir is too far south of the core range.

More suitable options we toyed with were

Kyrgyzstan Redstart and Tajikistan Redstart

but most favoured was Tien Shan Redstart

Central Asian Black Redstart is one option but seems a bit ‘lowest common denominator’ and functional only. Furthermore a large area of Central Asia is NOT occupied by phoenicuroides.

Given the record in Kent in November 2011 whose identity was ratified by a sample of excrement collected at the site, I really liked ‘Kentish Crapstart’. But somehow I don’t think it will catch on…

Blyth’s Pipit in West Yorkshire

and those two call types

Martin Garner

The Patchwork Challenge and on a smaller scale the Foot-it Challenge have given some form to the wonder and passion of local area birding. There is great banter and not a little rivalry as folk work their patches. Citizen science wins too. When Jonny Holliday found a Blyth’s Pipit two days ago on his patch it was a bit of a shocker. I know the area as I used to visit regularly when living in Sheffield. The patch the Blyth’s Pipit has chosen couldn’t be more seemingly incongruous.

Blyth's Pipit at Calder Wetlands, West Yorkshire by Jonny Holliday

Blyth’s Pipit at Calder Wetlands, West Yorkshire by Jonny Holliday

RBA have produced this helpful map which illustrates its chosen habitat- thats the M1 motorway to the left and an industrial complex all around:

map

Dave Aitken provided great companionship and most of the flight shots below are his. I enjoyed meeting a number of birding buddies there too.

It’s a remarkable find. Hearing both of the classic call types was once again educational. The longer “Richard’s Pipit-like call’ which I transcribe as splee-u sounded to my ears – not really like a Richards Pipit at all, being somewhat disyllabic sounding, higher pitched, down-slurred and sweeter– more flava wagtail like (as it has been described before). The ‘chip’ call was great to hear.

Have a listen (apologies re: motorway noise and wind)- how would you describe the call versus Richard’s Pipit?

Blyths pipit Dave Aitken 5

Blyths pipit Dave Aitken 8

 

Blyth's Pipit shleep call 9th Dec 2014 four

 

Blyths Pipit chip call 9th dec 2014.png two

 

Blyth's Pipit by Dave Aitken- which reveals the second outermost tail feather with small blob of white near the tail tip- versus more extensive white wedge on T5 found on a Richard's Pipit.

Blyth’s Pipit by Dave Aitken- which reveals the second outermost tail feather with small blob of white near the tail tip- versus more extensive white wedge on T5 found on a Richard’s Pipit.

As there have been a few understandable and legitimate comments on social media about ‘organised flushing’ – some excellent leg-pulling and also some more mischievous comments  (where presumptions are more interesting and provide easier fuel for scandal mongering than the truth) – for the record:

Seeing the bird was not easy so full credit to Jonny for making it work with minimal disturbance to the bird- which could have been very different. It’s a site that anyone can walk in and through, and indeed on several occasions since it was found the bird’s chosen field has been overrun by visiting birders. To manage this (some 400+ visitors yesterday) at periodic intervals a small group (usually 2-3 people) would walk along the western edge of the field on one sweep (leaving about 4\5 of the field undisturbed). The bird was seen to fly up usually once or twice, sometimes with Meadow Pipits. Considerable periods were spent with birders standing patiently on the bank without entering the field. While arguably not perfect, and I understand for some folk even this is a step too far, this seemed far more preferable than ‘leaving it to chance’ – which on several occasions already has lead to the field being overrun – and uncontrolled disturbance.

 

Once again- a remarkable ‘lifetimes find’ for Jonny and a the wonder of birds and their movements. Thanks for sharing it.

Blyth's Pipit JH 2

 

Santa’s top tips for the wannabe mammal-watcher

Dan Brown

Fancy a new challenge in 2015? Then why not take up mammal-watching? Here’s a few tips on getting started

So your mum’s asked you what you want for Christmas, you’ve got all the bird books you need, optics are too expensive, and you feel like a new challenge for 2015. Moths are so 2014, how about mammals?? We continually pass them by as not being exciting enough in the UK but there are loads to see and take a trip in to the WP and the options are endless.

Most mammals require patience and field-craft in order to get good view, some however, don't! This iPhoned fox proved incredibly obliging and an enjoyable experience despite the ubiquitous nature of the species.

Most mammals require patience and field-craft in order to get good view, some however, don’t! This iPhoned fox proved incredibly obliging and an enjoyable experience despite the ubiquitous nature of the species.

Knowing which bits of kit or books to buy can often be the biggest stumbling block when starting out on a new taxa so here’s a brief intro to the kit that will help you to your first Pine Marten encounter or knowing your Striped from your Common Dolphins. I

A bit of research into what to see where can soon find you close-up and personal with most British mammals. These Common Seals can be seen from the roadside in the Cromaty Firth

A bit of research into what to see where can soon find you close-up and personal with most British mammals. These Common Seals can be seen from the roadside in the Cromaty Firth

[’m assuming here that everyone has a pair of bins and a ‘scope and camera are also useful additions to your arsenal of mammaling kit.]

Books

Obviously the best place to start; there’s not a lot of point in searching for mammals if you don’t know what to expect or don’t know what you’re looking at when you do see something! Three key books should see you through your average day in the field in the UK & Western Palearctic: Mammals of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East (Aulagnier et al 2008 A&C Black), Where to Watch Mammals: Britain & Ireland (Moores 2007 A&C Black), and Whales, Dolphins, and Seals: A field Guide to the Marine Mammals of the World (Shirihai & Jarret 2007 A&C Black). If you want to delve further in to the subject then Bats of Britain, Europe & Northwest Africa (Dietz et al 2007) and The art of tracking animals ( Jedrzejewksi & Sidorovich 2010) are also worth a good read.

All the books you'll ever need for Mammaling in the WP!

All the books you’ll ever need for Mammaling in the WP!

Gadgets

No ecologist is complete without a gadget or two to play with. Bat detectors have been around a long time and are easy to pick up, from £80 basic models to £1000+. What you get for your money varies considerably and the more basic models wont produce an on-screen sonogram (something which is great to look at and considerable aids ID in the field). Knowing which bats are cruising around your garden as you kick back with a glass of wine after a summer BBQ is always satisfying. The likes of The One Stop Nature shop (http://www.onestopnature.co.uk) has a selection of more affordable (but still good) detectors, whilst NHBS has a range of more professional devices. There are now also a range of static bat detectors such as Anabats and SM2s that can be left in situ for extended periods to record bat activity.

The Mammalers Gadgets (clockwise from top left): Bushnell trail cam, SM2 static bat detector, GPS unit, EM3 hand-held bat detector.

The Mammalers Gadgets (clockwise from top left): Bushnell trail cam, SM2 static bat detector, GPS unit, EM3 hand-held bat detector.

Trail Cams or Camera Traps have surged in popularity recently as the costs have dropped and the technology advanced. I’ll be doing a full review of camera traps in January so if this is something you’re interested in then I suggest saving your pennies and holding out until the new year! In brief though, they are a valuable asset to any wildlife enthusiast and great fun to use. They are also considerably under-used by birders – think how many rails and crakes we would be detected by putting a camera trap on a pool edge…

Camera trapping offers an amazing way of identifying species presence and absence, especially when it comes to elusive mammals. This Water Vole colony was only confirmed through positioning a camera on the ditch line.

Camera trapping offers an amazing way of identifying species presence and absence, especially when it comes to elusive mammals. This Water Vole colony was only confirmed through positioning a camera on the ditch line.

It might be a non-descript ditch but its amazing what you find when you set a camera trap. A brood of 8 Teal were also successfully raised in this ditch!

It might be a non-descript ditch but its amazing what you find when you set a camera trap. A brood of 8 Teal were also successfully raised in this ditch!

Lastly, GPS – if you’re down Aousserd Road in Western Sahara then GPSing any sightings will greatly benefit nature conservation in the country. The same applies all over Europe and the WP. GPS and indeed mobile phone apps such as Viewranger are superb for recording and mapping sightings. Garmin and other companies produced a range of great value cheap GPS units.

Traps

If you want to take mammaling to the next level then it frequently requires trapping. HOWEVER please check that you have the appropriate licenses if trapping abroad, and have also applied for a Shrew license if necessary in the UK (for more info see: https://www.gov.uk/wildlife-licences). Longworth Traps are the most successful in terms of catch-rates but cost a fortune per unit. A cheaper alternative are Sherman traps which don’t have as high a catch rate but are still good and more easily transported. Don’t forget to provide bedding and of course bait!

Good luck and happy mammaling!

The best way of getting close up with small mammals is through trapping. These Sherman traps are ideal and the RSPB health food snacks seem to work well.

The best way of getting close up with small mammals is through trapping. These Sherman traps are ideal and the RSPB health food snacks seem to work well.

“Bird Book of the Year 2014” – Sunday Express newspaper

Challenge Series: Autumn

Martin Garner

Team. As I meet with Ray Scally and Chris Gaughan in Challeneg-series-covera few days, and plan some tweaks to web stuff with Andrew Chick I celebrate the fact I get to work with people like these. As I remember all the folk I have learned from and who contributed in varying degrees to the first of the Challenge Series; I celebrate them.

Nominated in a couple of places for ‘Bird Book of the Year 2014’  we made joint top place with Mark Avery in the Sunday Express Newspaper:

Here’s what top birding journalist, Stuart Winter said:

“The thrill of watching nature’s most vibrant creatures provides not only entertainment but a wealth of information for conservationists.
Charles Darwin wrote about the “extraordinary pleasure in pure observation” and his fascination with nature has sculpted the way we view our planet and why we must save the forms that have evolved over countless millennia.
Two of today’s eminent birding figures must be applauded for producing standout works that fully deserve sharing the Sunday Express Bird Book Of The Year.
Martin Garner and Mark Avery’s books illustrate why watching, studying and ultimately preserving birds is both enjoyable and a duty.
Martin is the mastermind behind the Birding Frontiers concept and his new paperback, titled Challenge Series: Autumn, promises to be the first part of an indispensable collection.
This compact book tackles a number of the identification conundrums that avant-garde birders are likely to encounter during the fall migration period.
It is A-level star material but the author’s readable style and knowledge take such esoteric subjects as the reed warbler complex and not only makes them simple but encourages you to make your own observations.
Among the 18 groups covered are lesser whitethroats, shrikes, flycatchers, stonechats and snipes. Concise, informative text, lots of bullet points, a host of excellent photographs and illustrations by Ray Scally make this a must-read guide.
Top marks also go for using QR codes, those signs that can be scanned by smartphones, to allow readers to download a welter of sound and video files”

Not got yours yet?

Need one for best, one for the car 😉

Buy it Here: Challenge Series BOOK.

There is still time for one of these:

 

Skuas-introductory-section

 

Anthony McGeehan kindly reviewed the book on his FACEBOOK page (superb photos as wonderful narrative with each one)

“Martin revels in ‘always discovering’. He has an ornithological knack of seeing the wood for the trees and distilling enormously complicated subjects into manageable concepts. Around 20 problematic groups of species are covered in the book. Individuals drawn from the selection are most likely to occur in autumn: hence the approach and packaging of the information. Photographs, lovely artwork (courtesy of Irish artist Ray Scally), concise text and – a new development – printed QR codes activated by a scan from a smart phone or tablet linking to dedicated webpages, allow content to be updated online. The book is a breath of fresh air and also breath-taking. Martin has blown away cobwebs and, without exaggeration, his efforts are lifting the veil on birds that most of us didn’t really think existed: inasmuch as they could ever be identified with any degree of certainty. Siberian Chiffchaff (in the photograph) is a nice example of a super warbler that, thanks to Martin’s efforts, is emerging from the shadows and, rather being branded ‘just a pale Chiffchaff from Eastern Europe’ is a long range migrant with a livery (and voice) all its own. Martin is putting fun back into bird-watching. He may tilt at windmills sometimes but his lance is tipped with Kryptonite. Congratulations, sir!”

One of these was in Suffolk, UK a couple of days ago:

Northern Treecreeper, 12th October 2013, Buckton, East Yorkshire. Mark Thomas

Northern Treecreeper, 12th October 2013, Buckton, East Yorkshire. Mark Thomas

and here’s the overview of the on-line QR codes page:

Challenge Series - Book1

 

to buy the Challenge series: AUTUMN. Just click here

 

An Exotic Robin in China

By Terry

When most birders think of exotic robins in China, it’s images of Blackthroat, Rufous-headed Robin or Siberian Rubythroat that come to mind.  However, at a 15th century World Heritage Site in the heart of Beijing, it’s a different species that has captured the imagination of local birders and photographers on an unprecedented scale.

On 10 November 2014 a local bird photographer posted onto a Chinese photography forum some photos he had taken in the Temple of Heaven Park.  It was a bird he had not seen before.  Sharp-eyed local birders Huang Hanchen and Li Xiaomai quickly spotted the images, posting them onto the Birding Beijing WeChat group, where they caused quite a stir.  It was a EUROPEAN ROBIN!  WOW!! (“BOOM” hasn’t yet caught on in Chinese birding circles).

The following day I was on site at dawn, together with 3 young Chinese birders.  The only directions we had were vague at best – “the northwest section“.  Temple of Heaven Park is a huge site and, after a 3-hour search, there was no sign of the exotic visitor.  My 3 companions decided to leave to look for a Brown-eared Bulbul (another Beijing rarity) that had been reported in Jingshan Park.  I decided to walk one more circuit around an area of shrubs that looked the most likely spot for a Robin.  Along the last line of shrubs I suddenly heard a call – one that I immediately recognised from home.  It was hard to believe, and I almost felt embarrassed, but my heart leapt!  Immediately afterwards, a blurred shape made a dart from a bush, across the path in front of me, deep into the base of another thick shrub.  It was a full 5 minutes before I was able to secure a clear view.  It was still here – a European Robin!!  I hurriedly sent out a message to the group and, just a few minutes later, the original 3 birders were back and we all enjoyed intermittent views of what was, at that time, a very elusive bird.

Little did we know what a fuss this bird would cause.  Over the next few days the local bird photographers flocked to the site and, on a single day that week, there were over 150 photographers present (see below).  It was a scene reminiscent of a “first for Britain” and, despite a similar but much smaller scale twitch two years ago for another robin – Japanese Robin – this was something I had not seen in China before….

Bird photographers at the Temple of Heaven Park a few days after the initial sighting.  Photo by China Youth Daily

Bird photographers at the Temple of Heaven Park a few days after the initial sighting. Photo by China Youth Daily

As is often the case in China (as well as large parts of Asia), some of the photographers immediately began putting out mealworms and created artificial perches for the bird to try to create the conditions for the most aesthetically pleasing photos possible.  It wasn’t long before the robin became habituated and performed spectacularly for the assembled masses.

And the interest in this bird has not dwindled.  As I write this, on 6 December, there are still many photographers on site, almost four weeks after the initial sighting.  Incredible.  It must be the most photographed EUROPEAN ROBIN ever.

6th December: still a good crowd of bird photographers almost 4 weeks after the Robin was first seen.

6th December: still a good crowd of bird photographers almost 4 weeks after the Robin was first seen.

During its stay, as well as bird photographers, this bird has attracted unprecedented attention from the Chinese media, with articles published in The China Daily (in English) and China Youth Daily (in Chinese), the latter reporting that this individual has come all the way from England!  There is no doubt that this vagrant – an ambassador for wild birds – has raised awareness among many people in Beijing about the importance of Beijing’s parks for wild birds and generated an appreciation for the birds that can be found in the capital.

A species that we take for granted in Europe, this bird’s presence is a reminder both that the European Robin is a stunningly beautiful bird and that watching rare birds is all relative.  In Europe birders dream of finding a SIBERIAN RUBYTHROAT or visiting China to see the enigmatic BLACKTHROAT.  In Beijing, it’s a EUROPEAN ROBIN that gets the juices flowing….  and rightly so….!

The world's most photographed EUROPEAN ROBIN (Erithacus rubecula), Temple of Heaven Park, Beijing, 3 December 2014

The world’s most photographed EUROPEAN ROBIN (Erithacus rubecula), Temple of Heaven Park, Beijing, 3 December 2014

Status of EUROPEAN ROBIN in China.

The European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) has recently been discovered as a regular winter visitor, in small numbers, to western Xinjiang, in the far northwest of China.  It is very rare further east, with just one previous record in Beijing, a bird that spent the winter in the grounds of Peking University in 2007-2008.  

 

A troublesome juvenile Stint

in Devon

Peter Aley

On 19th October 2014, whilst on a regular circuit of my local patch – the Plym Estuary – I came across a small wader roosting at high tide with a couple of Ringed Plovers and some Turnstones. Its’ tiny size, and neat proportions rapidly brought me to the conclusion that it was a “stint/peep” and the grey tones pointed to the possibility of a Semipalmated Sandpiper.

I alerted a handful of other birders who I knew would be nearby and after watching and discussing the bird for a short time, we all agreed to put the news out as a probable Semi-p. By nightfall a dozen or so birders had seen the bird and all agreed the news could safely be put out as confirmed.

The bird was not particularly close but we were struck by the grey tones, short primary extension, and lack of solid centres to the scapulars (the internal markings narrowing at the base with some discussion over whether they could be described as anchors or arrow heads). No pale mantle nor scapular lines were evident and some observers were happy they had seen a blob-ended bill. The first two photos below – my poor quality digi-scoped shots – give an idea of the sort of views and impression of the bird, at this time.   s1 s2 The following day, more observers saw the bird and everyone seemed happy with the ID, with no-one (to my knowledge) raising any doubts. On this occasion (despite the bird being mainly more distant than the day before) I noticed a narrow pale mantle “V” but this appeared pretty indistinct. However, that evening, I reflected on this, together with the fact I wasn’t sure any credible anchors were apparent on the scapulars and (try as I might) I couldn’t see a bill blob in the field nor in my pics. The lack of solid scapular internal markings and short primary projection, seemed inconsistent with Little Stint and it “felt” like a Semi-p, but I just didn’t have anything really concrete on which to nail it.

I phoned Mashuq Ahmad to share my concerns, and during the ¾ hour phone conversation, he imparted a wealth of useful information, while we looked at the photos. This reinforced my concerns and we both agreed the ID couldn’t be 100% certain. Late that evening I posted a short note on the Devon Bird News blog saying I had some niggling doubts and appealing for views and better photos.

Despite this, by the following evening (after my further views and photos proven inconclusive) no-one had communicated any doubts. My frustration levels were rising but then Alan Doidge emailed me a series of excellent pictures he had taken that afternoon (below) including some close shots of the feet which clearly showed no palmations – it was a Little Stint! s5 s3   Soon after this, Killian Mullarney, contacted me having picked up the “story” from the Devon Birds News blog and asked to see the clinching photos. He has commented as follows:-

“Thank you very much for forwarding me Alan Doidge’s excellent shots of your tricky stint. I must admit, I was all prepared to present a case for it being a Semipalmated on which the palmations were not visible, which can sometimes happen, until I saw the photos; you are of course absolutely correct in determining that it is indeed a Little Stint and kudos to you for having been so cautious about your ID from the outset.

I sometimes come across occasional tricky Little Stints, especially in late autumn. The ones that are most prone to being mistaken for Semipalmateds are birds that have lost much of their bright colouration as a result of fading/bleaching and, in addition, have commenced the post-juvenile moult with replacement of the outer rows of mantle feathers and third row of scapulars (which diminishes /eliminates the characteristic white mantle/scapular stripes). The initial photos of your bird suggest a Semipalmated-like uniformity to the upperparts, without much warmth and seemingly without any hint of light mantle stripes, and there is no indication of the bird having commenced moult. It also has a rather short primary-projection compared to most Little Stints.

However, Alan’s much better shots establish that it does in fact have distinct white mantle stripes, they are just not visible in the initial shots. All other details, such as the crown pattern, breast-side streaking and detailed pattern/shape of the upperparts feathers are more indicative of Little Stint than Semipalmated; of course the clear absence of palmations confirms that it is not a Semipalmated! By the way, some Semipalmateds have a bill that really isn’t significantly more blob-tipped’ than Little Stint, so I would not be too concerned about the absence of that feature on a putative Semip.”

 

Mashuq Ahmad summed it up nicely saying:-

“The feet don’t lie! Some of Alan Doidge’s quality shots, also shows a pro-Little Stint, obvious pale mantle line and to a lesser extent a more obvious pale scapular line (which has seemingly been reduced somewhat by wear). The bill shape is also very evident in these shots.

These features, plus other pointers e.g. internal scap’ pattern, relatively pale ear-coverts, boldly marked breast-sides and general shape and structure, should also help put to bed thoughts of a greyer Red-necked Stint (which should also really be considered, now that it has been established that the bird lacks palmations). All in all a difficult bird to sort out but you got there in the end!”

The episode reinforces how tricky some Little Stints can be to identify, especially in late autumn. I am grateful to Killian, Mush and Alan for their respective contributions to the learning around this challenging bird.

Pete Aley, Plymouth

peteraley@msn.com

 

Comment from Ontario added 11th Dec 2014

Hi Peter and Martin.

I thought I would add a bit from a North American perspective on that stint. First off, I agree that it is a juvenile-first winter Little Stint. One feature which is particularly evident in the best photo, which shows the bird in profile, involves primary tip position versus the longest tertial. I don’t think there was any mention of this in the various discussions. I should also say that I have studied Little Stint, especially juveniles, in many photographs in anticipation of getting very lucky and finding one here in southern Ontario. At present, there are only two records so far for this species in the province.

To get back to the point, juvenile Semipalmated (and Western) Sandpipers are quickly recognized for their “stumpy ended” gestalt which creates a rather short primary tip projection, with only juvenile Least Sandpiper’s being shorter. To be more precise, P8 only extends a short way past the tip of the longest tertial. P7 falls a fair bit short of it. Though difficult to see in the field, top notch photos of birds in profile show this consistently in my experience. In the photograph of the Devon bird, I can see a fair projection of P8, but just as importantly, the tip of P7 appears to lie just about beside the tip of the longest tertial. I should say that I have found this character in the vast majority if not all of the photographs I have referenced on juvenile Little Stint. Though perhaps not having the diagnostic caliber of relative toe structure, I feel this is a very good ID indicator for juveniles in these species.

Kevin McLaughlin, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Link

aka Kashmir Tien Shan Redstart… at Scarborough

Found on Saturday by resident and local Scarborough birder Steve Pinder in and around his garden. As most field guides don’t illustrate such new and emerging species as the Eastern Black Redstart (seen what I sneaked in there) he thought it must be a male Common Redstart. Thankfully Long Nab devotee, Nick Addey thought he’d better take a look. BOOM! Britain’s 5th ever Eastern Black Redstart taxon: phoenicuroides.

P.S. Excellent craic with Flambro and Filey birders- Rich and Gaynor, Phil C. and Mark (WBD) Pearson…

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1st Dec 2014 j

It’s a 1cy male with mostly adult type greater coverts on the left wing but more obvious mix of juvenile and adult type greater coverts on the right wing. A bit of video (it looks very smart!)

The wing formula looks good for phoenicuroides but here it is for the further close study with primary tips and some emarginations action :). Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1st Dec 2014 f

 

and I was very grateful to capture some calls as it had bouts of being quite vocal. Want to look at this versus other redstart calls when get chance. Of jump in if you are interested and have comment to make on these calls.

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1 dec 2014 sonagram

 

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1st Dec 2014 h

Eastern Black Redstart Scarboro 1st Dec 2014 e